The Disaster Zone - An Emergency Preparedness Blog

May 04, 2016

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3 Unsafe Outdoor Water Sources

 

Here are 3 outdoor water sources that you are advised to never drink:

 

#1 Avoid dirty, discolored and/or smelly water

If you’re really thirsty, it might be tempting to drink water with a bit of debris in it. But you should avoid that urge at all costs. Water with floating material, odors, or dark color can be dangerous. You could end up getting sick, or worse.

 

#2 Salt water sources

Unless you’re able to distill it, you should never use saltwater as a water source. Saltwater will dehydrate you further and you’ll end up more dehydrated than when you started.

 

#3 Do not drink flood water

It might be tempting to drink from a newly formed river rushing through your front yard, but we assure you it’s not worth it. Flood water picks up nasty debris, pollutants and other toxic materials that can end up making you really sick.

 

 

Need More Information?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Community and Family Preparedness Program and American Red Cross Community Disaster Education are nationwide efforts to help people prepare for disasters of all types. You can find information for your specific region on the American Red Cross website.

For more information, please visit www.fema.gov and www.ready.gov, or contact your local emergency preparedness outlet.

Contact FEMA at:

1-800-480-2520

FEMA

P.O. Box 2012

Jessup, MD 20794-2012

 

 

Follow Us on Social Media for More Updates & Special Promotions:

 Facebook.com/earthquakesupplycenter

 Twitter.com/earthquakepros (@earthquakepros)

 YouTube: Earthquake Supply Center

 Instagram.com/earthquakesupplycenter (@earthquakesupplycenter)

 

 

4 Emergency Outdoor Water Sources (and Ways to Purify Them)

 

In addition to using either water purifiers or water filters on questionable water, you can also treat your water with purification tablets to make it drinkable.

 

While boiling is one of the most effective methods to make water safe to drink, it is time consuming and requires some planning.

If you need to find water outside your home, you can use the following sources. Be sure to treat the water according to these instructions in our previous blog post before drinking it.

 

  • Rainwater
  • Streams, rivers and other moving bodies of water
  • Ponds and lakes
  • Natural springs

 

 

Need More Information?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Community and Family Preparedness Program and American Red Cross Community Disaster Education are nationwide efforts to help people prepare for disasters of all types. You can find information for your specific region on the American Red Cross website.

For more information, please visit www.fema.gov and www.ready.gov, or contact your local emergency preparedness outlet.

Contact FEMA at:

1-800-480-2520

FEMA

P.O. Box 2012

Jessup, MD 20794-2012

 

Here are some of the water purification items we currently sell:
(Note: we sell additional items; this list is not exclusive)


Water Purifier, UV SteriPen, Ultra

$ 99.95

 

 

LifeStraw Go Water Filter

$ 39.95

 

 

 

Follow Us on Social Media for More Updates & Special Promotions:

 Facebook.com/earthquakesupplycenter

 Twitter.com/earthquakepros (@earthquakepros)

 YouTube: Earthquake Supply Center

 Instagram.com/earthquakesupplycenter (@earthquakesupplycenter)

 

 

April 20, 2016

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5 Unsafe Drinking Water Sources

It is not safe to drink from the following sources:

  • Radiators
  • Hot water boilers (home heating systems)
  • Water from the toilet bowl or flush tank
  • Water beds: fungicides added to the water or chemicals in the vinyl may make water unsafe to use.
  • Swimming pools and spas: chemicals used to kill germs are too concentrated for safe drinking but can be used for personal hygiene, cleaning and related uses.
 

 

Need More Information?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Community and Family Preparedness Program and American Red Cross Community Disaster Education are nationwide efforts to help people prepare for disasters of all types. You can find information for your specific region on the American Red Cross website.

For more information, please visit www.fema.gov and www.ready.gov, or contact your local emergency preparedness outlet.

Contact FEMA at:

1-800-480-2520

FEMA

P.O. Box 2012

Jessup, MD 20794-2012

 

 

Follow Us on Social Media for More Updates & Special Promotions:

 Facebook.com/earthquakesupplycenter

 Twitter.com/earthquakepros (@earthquakepros)

 YouTube: Earthquake Supply Center

 Instagram.com/earthquakesupplycenter (@earthquakesupplycenter)

 

 

April 13, 2016

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3 Hidden Water Sources In Your Home

 

In order to be prepared for an unexpected emergency or disaster situation you need to protect the water sources already in your home.

Safe water sources in your home include:

  • The water in your hot water tank
  • The water in your pipes
  • Water prepared in ice cubes

You should not use water from toilet flush tanks or bowls, radiators, waterbeds, or swimming pools/ spas.

If you hear reports of broken water or sewage lines in your area, or if local officials advise you of a problem, take precautions to protect your drinking water from contamination immediately. To shut off incoming water, locate the main valve and turn it to the closed position. Be sure you and other family members in your household know how to perform this important procedure before an emergency strikes.

 

Access to Safe Water Sources in Your Home: 

  1. To use the water in your pipes, let air into the plumbing by turning on the highest available faucet in your home (in the highest reachable story). A small amount of water will trickle out. Then obtain water from the lowest available faucet in the home (for example in your basement).
  2. To use the water in your hot-water tank, first be sure the electricity or gas is off. Then open the drain at the bottom of the tank. Start the water flowing by turning off the water intake valve at the tank and turning on any hot-water faucet in the house. Refill the tank before turning the gas or electricity back on. If the gas is turned off, a professional will be needed to turn it back on.

  

Need More Information?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Community and Family Preparedness Program and American Red Cross Community Disaster Education are nationwide efforts to help people prepare for disasters of all types. You can find information for your specific region on the American Red Cross website.

For more information, please visit www.fema.gov and www.ready.gov, or contact your local emergency preparedness outlet.

Contact FEMA at:

1-800-480-2520

FEMA

P.O. Box 2012

Jessup, MD 20794-2012

 

Here are some of the water filter items we currently sell:
(Note: we sell additional items; this list is not exclusive)


Water Filter, Replacement (Virus)

$ 32.95

 

 

Berkey Light Water Filter System

$250.00

 

 

 

Follow Us on Social Media for More Updates & Special Promotions:

 Facebook.com/earthquakesupplycenter

 Twitter.com/earthquakepros (@earthquakepros)

 YouTube: Earthquake Supply Center

 Instagram.com/earthquakesupplycenter (@earthquakesupplycenter)

 

 

April 06, 2016

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3 Ways to Treat Your Water to Make It Drinkable

 

 

The instructions below are for treating water of uncertain quality in rare emergency situations in the absence of instructions from local authorities when no other reliable clean water source is available and you have used all of your stored water. Keep in mind that if you store enough water in advance, you will not need to treat water using these or other methods.

 

1. Method: Boiling

Boiling is the safest method of treating water.

Here are the steps:

  1. In a large pot or kettle, bring water to a rolling boil for 1 full minute, keeping in mind that some water will evaporate.
  2. Let the water cool before drinking. Boiled water will taste better if you put oxygen back into it by pouring the water back and forth between two clean containers. This will also improve the taste of stored water.
  3. You can use household liquid bleach to kill microorganisms. Use only regular household liquid bleach that contains 5.25 to 6.0 percent sodium hypochlorite. Do not use scented bleaches, color safe bleaches, or bleaches with added cleaners.
  4. Because the potency of bleach diminishes with time, use only bleach from a newly opened or unopened bottle.

 

2. Method: Chlorination

  1. Add 16 drops (1/8 teaspoon) of bleach per gallon of water, stir and let stand for 30 minutes.
  2. The water should have a slight bleach odor. If it doesn’t, then repeat the dosage and let stand another 15 minutes. If it still does not smell of bleach, discard it and find another source of water.

 

For both water treatments, boiling and chlorination, water treatment products that contain 5.25 to 6.0 percent sodium hypochlorite are recommended.

Boiling or chlorination will kill most microorganisms but will not, however, remove other contaminants such as heavy metals, salts, and most other chemicals. Before treating your water by boiling it or adding chlorination, let any suspended particles settle to the bottom, or strain them through layers of paper towel, clean cloth, or coffee filter.

In addition to using either water purifiers or water filters on questionable water, you can also treat your water with purification tablets to make it drinkable.

 

While the two methods described above will kill most microorganisms in water, distillation will remove microorganisms that resist these methods, as well as heavy metals, salts, and most other chemicals.

 

3. Method: Distillation

Distillation involves boiling water and then collecting the vapor that condenses back to water. The condensed vapor will not include salt or most other impurities.

  1. Fill a pot halfway with water.
  2. Tie a cup to the handle on the pot’s lid so that the cup will hang right-side-up when the lid is upside down (make sure the cup is not dangling into the water), and boil the water for 20 minutes.
  3. The water that drips from the lid into the cup is distilled (see illustration.)

 

 

While the three mention water treatment methods are fairly effective in treating your water to be drinkable in an emergency they are time consuming and require some planning.

Be sure to plan ahead before a disaster strikes, and keep a good supply of drinking water on hand at all times.

 

 

Need More Information?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Community and Family Preparedness Program and American Red Cross Community Disaster Education are nationwide efforts to help people prepare for disasters of all types. You can find information for your specific region on the American Red Cross website.

For more information, please visit www.fema.gov and www.ready.gov, or contact your local emergency preparedness outlet.

Contact FEMA at:

1-800-480-2520

FEMA

P.O. Box 2012

Jessup, MD 20794-2012

 

Here are some of the water purification items we currently sell:
(Note: we sell additional items; this list is not exclusive)


LifeStraw Go Water Filter

$39.95

 

 

Water Preserver, 55 Gal., 5-Year

$14.95

 

 

 

Follow Us on Social Media for More Updates & Special Promotions:

 Facebook.com/earthquakesupplycenter

 Twitter.com/earthquakepros (@earthquakepros)

 YouTube: Earthquake Supply Center

 Instagram.com/earthquakesupplycenter (@earthquakesupplycenter)

 

 

March 30, 2016

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5 Water Rules That Apply During an Emergency Situation

 

 (From: http://www.ready.gov/managing-water)

 

#1 Allow people to drink according to their needs:

Many people need even more than the average of one gallon per day. The individual amount needed depends on age, physical activity, physical condition and time of year.

 

#2 Never ration drinking water unless ordered to do so by authorities:

You can minimize the amount of water your body needs by reducing activity and staying cool.

 

#3 Drink water that you know is not contaminated first:

If necessary, suspicious water, such as cloudy water from regular faucets or water from streams or ponds, can be used after it has been treated. If water treatment is not possible, put off drinking suspicious water as long as possible, but do not become dehydrated.

 

#4 Do not drink carbonated beverages instead of drinking water:

Carbonated beverages do not meet drinking-water requirements. Caffeinated drinks and alcohol dehydrate the body, which increases the need for drinking water.

#5 Turn off the main water valves:

If you hear reports of broken water or sewage lines or if local officials advise you of a problem with the water in your area, you will need to protect the water sources that are already in your home from contamination. To close the incoming water source, locate the incoming valve and turn it to the closed position. Be sure you and your family members know how to perform this important procedure.

 

 

Need More Information?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Community and Family Preparedness Program and American Red Cross Community Disaster Education are nationwide efforts to help people prepare for disasters of all types. You can find information for your specific region on the American Red Cross website.

For more information, please visit www.fema.gov and www.ready.gov, or contact your local emergency preparedness outlet.

Contact FEMA at:

1-800-480-2520

FEMA

P.O. Box 2012

Jessup, MD 20794-2012

 

Here are some of the emergency water management items we currently sell:
(Note: we sell additional items; this list is not exclusive)


Water Purifier, UV SteriPen, Ultra

$ 99.95

 

 

LifeStraw Go Water Filter

$ 39.95

 

 

 

Follow Us on Social Media for More Updates & Special Promotions:

 Facebook.com/earthquakesupplycenter

 Twitter.com/earthquakepros (@earthquakepros)

 YouTube: Earthquake Supply Center

 Instagram.com/earthquakesupplycenter (@earthquakesupplycenter)

 

 

March 23, 2016

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5 Steps for Preparing Your Own Containers of Water

 

(Edited from: http://www.ready.gov/water)

 

For emergency water storage, it is recommended to purchase food-grade water storage containers from disaster and emergency preparedness supply stores.

It is best to not re-use storage containers that were use to hold other liquids. There is the leaching of harmful chemicals that can contaminate your water.

If you do decide, however, to re-use storage containers, choose two-liter plastic soft drink bottles — not plastic jugs or cardboard containers that have had milk or fruit juice in them. The reason for that is that milk protein and fruit sugars cannot be adequately removed from these containers and provide an environment for bacterial growth when water is stored in them. Cardboard containers leak easily and are not designed for long-term storage of liquids. Also, do not use glass containers, because they are heavy and may break.

To prepare your own safe containers of water supply follow these 5 steps:

  1. Thoroughly clean all containers with dishwashing soap and clean water, then rinse completely so there is no residual soap.
  1. For plastic soft drink bottles, sanitize the bottles by adding a solution of 1 teaspoon of non-scented liquid household chlorine bleach to a quart (1/4 gallon) of water. Swish the sanitizing solution in the bottle so that it touches all surfaces. After sanitizing the bottle, thoroughly rinse out the sanitizing solution with clean water.
  1. Fill the container to the top with regular tap water. (If your water utility company treats your tap water with chlorine, you do not need to add anything else to the water to keep it clean.) If the water you are using comes from a well or water source that is not treated with chlorine, add two drops of non-scented liquid household chlorine bleach to each gallon of water. 
  1. Tightly close the container using its original cap. Be careful not to contaminate the cap by touching the inside of it with your fingers. Write the date clearly visible with a waterproof marker on the outside of the container so that you know when you filled it. Store all containers in a cool, dark place.
  1. Replace the water every six months if you're not using commercially packaged water.
 
 

Need More Information?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Community and Family Preparedness Program and American Red Cross Community Disaster Education are nationwide efforts to help people prepare for disasters of all types. You can find information for your specific region on the American Red Cross website.

For more information, please visit www.fema.gov and www.ready.gov, or contact your local emergency preparedness outlet.

Contact FEMA at:

1-800-480-2520

FEMA

P.O. Box 2012

Jessup, MD 20794-2012

 

Here are some of the emergency water storage supplies we currently sell:
(Note: we sell additional items; this list is not exclusive)


Water Filter, Replacement (Cysts)

$ 16.95

 

 

LifeStraw Family Water Filter/Purifier

$ 89.95

Water Purifier, UV SteriPEN

$ 59.95

 

 

 

Follow Us on Social Media for More Updates & Special Promotions:

 Facebook.com/earthquakesupplycenter

 Twitter.com/earthquakepros (@earthquakepros)

 YouTube: Earthquake Supply Center

 Instagram.com/earthquakesupplycenter (@earthquakesupplycenter)

 

 

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